Calling Emirati jobseekers: new training aims to give UAE nationals the edge at work

Thank you for your reading and interest in the news Calling Emirati jobseekers: new training aims to give UAE nationals the edge at work and now with details

Hind Al Soulia - Riyadh - Emiratisation at work

Emiratisation was introduced in the UAE more than 10 years ago

It aims to boost the number of citizens in the workforce particularly in the private sector.

Growing the number of Emiratis in the workplace will help the UAE reduce dependence on overseas workers

The Cabinet in December last year, approved a national fund for Emirati jobseekers and guaranteed citizens working in the private sector a comparable pension

President Sheikh Khalifa has described Emiratisation as “a true measure for success”.

During the UAE’s 48th National Day, Sheikh Khalifa named education, entrepreneurship, Emiratisation and space travel among cornerstones of national development

More than 80 per cent of Emiratis work in the federal or local government as per 2017 Statistics

Fewer than one in ten Emiratis work in the private sector, according to the same study

The Emiratisation programme includes the creation of 20,000 new jobs for UAE citizens

UAE citizens will be given priority in managerial positions in the government sphere

The purpose is to raise the contribution of UAE nationals in the job market and create a diverse workforce of citizens

An Emirati lawyer has launched an e-learning job training scheme to teach UAE citizens critical skills to survive in a competitive market.

Harvard alumni Abdulla Al Jefri said there was need to coach fresh graduates and mid-level managers.

He is passionate about giving UAE citizens the best shot when they are pitted against experienced expatriates at work.

He has formulated an Arabic-language 'Najah Train' platform by drawing on local and overseas expertise to create the course content and videos. Najah means success in Arabic.

I got good grades but so did many others and there is so much competition in the world. I could have used more input on my CV and how to handle a job interview.

Sulaiman Al Marri, Emirati

“If a private sector company hires an Emirati, he has to be of the same or of better calibre than an expatriate with experience,” said Mr Al Jefri, who works for Abu Dhabi Judicial Department.

“We have the best people coming to work in the UAE. Emiratis also need the chance to be in the best in their jobs.”

The policy of Emiratisation, Tawteen in Arabic, is a central focus in the UAE and mandates inclusion of UAE nationals in the job market, particularly in the private sector, where as little as 2 per cent of citizens work.

President Sheikh Khalifa has described Emiratisation as a “tool for enabling” citizens and , the Vice President and Ruler of , announced in October that 20,000 new jobs would be created for Emiratis over the next two years.

Mr Al Jefri has run dozens of training courses and seen first-hand how university students and young managers fall short in the job hunt.

“We are focussing on Emirati job seekers. The programme has been created understanding the challenges we face in this country based on our culture and environment,” said the 36-year-old, who completed a master’s degree in public administration from the Harvard Kennedy School, and spent years rebuilding his life after a serious car accident.

“What makes it unique is that it is designed specifically for people of this country and that it is in Arabic.”

Abdulla Al Jefri talks through his Arabic-language jobs programme

He aims to plug a gap in the market where online courses on work skills are usually in English, the instructional material is lengthy and long-winded and do not specifically address young Emiratis.

About 16 courses cover time management, communication, problem solving, negotiation, creativity and innovation.

The information includes tips to kickstart a job search and refresh skills of mid-career professionals. Each course ends with a quiz and an assessment.

“There are people with strong academic and professional qualifications but in job interviews they don’t move ahead because they need to develop soft skills,” he said.

Research by Harvard University, the Carnegie Foundation and Stanford University Research Centre in 2016 showed that 85 per cent of job success came from well-developed soft or people skills, the remaining 15 per cent was attributed to technical know-how.

“Our material is direct and to the point,” said Mr Al Jefri.

“There is an exercise at the end of each course to find out whether you have understood the segment.”

There is a growing appetite among young Emiratis for such training.

Emirati Sulaiman Al Marri, a business administration graduate, said he wished he was better prepared to navigate the job market.

“I got good grades but so did many others and there is so much competition in the world,” said Mr Al Marri, 22, who has completed internships with construction and technology firms but is still looking for a full time job.

“I could have used more input on my CV and how to handle a job interview.”

Mr Al Jefri has held meetings with federal, regional government departments to use the programme for in-house training sessions.

Collaborations with universities are being discussed so students can access the programme before they graduate.

“In training evaluations, we realised the gaps and when we dug deeper we found the problem was basic information about how to deal with issues in an office,” he said.

“These are skills required in any department in any company that will be useful for Emiratis.”

The application will work on smartphones and tablets. The software also allows a company’s human resource department to track the progress of staffers who log in and a report is generated to confirm employees have completed the course.

It has taken Mr Al Jefri more than three years to pull together the programme.

“Our national agenda is based on Emirati human capital so people are exactly what we need to invest in,” he said.

Updated: January 19, 2020 10:11 AM

Emiratisation at work

Emiratisation was introduced in the UAE more than 10 years ago

It aims to boost the number of citizens in the workforce particularly in the private sector.

Growing the number of Emiratis in the workplace will help the UAE reduce dependence on overseas workers

The Cabinet in December last year, approved a national fund for Emirati jobseekers and guaranteed citizens working in the private sector a comparable pension

President Sheikh Khalifa has described Emiratisation as “a true measure for success”.

During the UAE’s 48th National Day, Sheikh Khalifa named education, entrepreneurship, Emiratisation and space travel among cornerstones of national development

More than 80 per cent of Emiratis work in the federal or local government as per 2017 Statistics

Fewer than one in ten Emiratis work in the private sector, according to the same study

The Emiratisation programme includes the creation of 20,000 new jobs for UAE citizens

UAE citizens will be given priority in managerial positions in the government sphere

The purpose is to raise the contribution of UAE nationals in the job market and create a diverse workforce of citizens

These were the details of the news Calling Emirati jobseekers: new training aims to give UAE nationals the edge at work for this day. We hope that we have succeeded by giving you the full details and information. To follow all our news, you can subscribe to the alerts system or to one of our different systems to provide you with all that is new.

It is also worth noting that the original news has been published and is available at The National and the editorial team at AlKhaleej Today has confirmed it and it has been modified, and it may have been completely transferred or quoted from it and you can read and follow this news from its main source.

PREV Sharjah Book Fair undaunted by pandemic, plans special session
NEXT Mohamed bin Zayed raises value of prizes of 16th Liwa Date Festival