Australia Test squad against India | DE24 News

Australia Test squad against India | DE24 News
Australia Test squad against India | DE24 News
The Australian selection players will sit down next week when the first phase of the Sheffield Shield season ends and the test team against India is selected.

The enlarged group is expected to be around 17 – “give or take,” said national selector Trevor Hohns – so assuming the 12 players who were featured last season (James Pattinson for the injured Josh Hazlewood was the only change), are locked up. This may leave five spots free to cover all positions and options for various conditions.

It has been an intriguing Shield season so far – both in terms of the quality of cricket and those that make an impact – but who could be closest to the established players?

Will Pucovski

Innings 1; Runs 255

He’s been around earlier – against Sri Lanka in the summer of 2018/19 – but could this be the season for his much-anticipated Test debut? His start, delayed by Victoria’s quarantine hit, could not have gone better with an unbeaten 255 against South Australia within the Sheffield Shield’s record high of 486. It was the first time he had been the first to open cricket in the class and while facing more demanding conditions, his focus and hunger for runs stood out (not to mention a few strokes). It would also have the advantage of covering every position in the top six.

Marcus Harris

Innings 1; Runs 239

The other half of that record high, Harris’ 239, was an early reward for the hard work he put in the preseason to make some minor technical tweaks after his first stint as a test opener – the last part ended after a poor ash tour . As with Pucovski, it was an almost flawless display against the Redbacks, and large hundreds tend to stand out from the selectors. However, if Pucovski and the next player on that list are given seats, there may not be a place for another batsman.

Cameron Green

Innings 5; Runs 307; Average 76.75 | Over 12; Gates 1

The all-rounder has already been the center of much discussion this season – he scored an outstanding career-best 197 against New South Wales – and was first called up to the squad with limited overruns a few weeks ago. And its numbers in these formats, albeit from a small number of games, are faded by its top-notch club-and-ball numbers. For the first time in a year, he reverted to the previous game’s bowling fold, posting 12 overs over four spells. The feeling, however, is that this is his turnpike pedigree that the Selectors want to include him in anyway.

Michael Neser

Innings 3; Runs 145; Average 48.33 | Over 68.1; Gates 7; Average 20.71

Neser knows all about carrying the drinks for the test site. In terms of the first test cap for the all-rounder in Queensland, this was a case of so close and yet so far. It remains difficult to see him beat the big four quicks unless he has an injury, though four tests a month mean reserves must be ready. He had a brilliant start to the season with a five-wicket train followed by a first-class century against Western Australia, while his run out in the final moments of the thrilling game against New South Wales was another reminder of his extensive engagement.

Sean Abbott

Innings 3; Runs 144; Average 144.00 | Over 58.4; Wickets 10; Average 16.80

He had two impressive games for New South Wales to throw himself into the test bout. His neat-stitch bowling has earned ten wickets while having a staple of half a century – he’s better than a career batting average of 19.81 – including the top score in the first innings against Queensland, and then held his nerve to seal the victory. A cricketer similar to Neser in many ways, but whether or not he steps in may depend on how many additional bowlers are needed.

Mitchell Swepson

About 124.2; Gates 15; Average 20.33

The legspinner is the leading wicket taker in the early stages of the Shield, which was central to Queensland’s first two games. He helped secure the win against Tasmania – 45.2 overs in the second innings – and a career-best match of 10 for 171 came close to beating New South Wales. He was in the squad for the SCG Test against New Zealand in January and that would probably be his chance in this series if Nathan Lyon wasn’t injured.

Ashton-agar

Innings 4; Runs 144; Average 48.00 | Over 155; Wickets 10; Average 39.70

In terms of bowling, Agar doesn’t match Swepson in the spin stakes – despite making a five-wicket draw against South Australia – but he does offer a multi-dimensional option, as evidenced by his century in 6th place in the opening game. While the rounder talk turns to Green, Agar could be another way for Australia to even out their side if at any point they want two crank.

And a few others …

Shaun Marsh was in fantastic shape but at 37 his time is definitely over. Teammate Sam Whiteman has made two centuries to show its inaugural badges during Cameron Bancroft seems to be recovering from a terrible 2019-20 season. Moises Henriques earned a limited overs recall, doing 167 in his first shield innings of the season.

Im Bowling Time, Scott Boland was great against South Australia on a flat course, taking 6 for 61 in the second innings and Trent Copeland reminded everyone that he is as good as always.

With Matthew Wade in the test setup, he might be adequate wicketkeeping support for Tim Paine, but if another is required Alex Careywho has already participated in the IPL would be the favorite Josh Inglis averages a striking 114.50 this season.

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