Why is the Democratic Party symbol a donkey and the Republican...

Why is the Democratic Party symbol a donkey and the Republican...
Why is the Democratic Party symbol a donkey and the Republican...

During the campaign for the 1828 presidential election, the Democratic candidate’s opponents, Andrew Jackson, insisted on calling him a donkey. The hero of the Anglo-American War of 1812, instead of being offended, decided to put a donkey on his campaign posters.

Jackson then defeated incumbent John Quincy Adams and became the first member of the Democratic Party to be elected president of the USA.

In the 1870s, the butter was even adopted as symbol Democratic Party, following the publication of a cartoon Thomas Nast’s politician who evoked Jackson’s feat.

As for the Republican Party, it was founded in 1854 and, six years later, Abraham Lincoln became its first member to assume the presidency of the USA. The image of an elephant began to be associated with Republicans during the Civil War, when “seeing an elephant” was a common expression among soldiers who referred to having combat experience.

But the pachyderme would only definitely be assumed as symbol Republican Party in the 1870s and also through the cartoons politicians that Nast published in American newspapers.

These were the details of the news Why is the Democratic Party symbol a donkey and the Republican... for this day. We hope that we have succeeded by giving you the full details and information. To follow all our news, you can subscribe to the alerts system or to one of our different systems to provide you with all that is new.

It is also worth noting that the original news has been published and is available at time24.news and the editorial team at AlKhaleej Today has confirmed it and it has been modified, and it may have been completely transferred or quoted from it and you can read and follow this news from its main source.

PREV Indian farmers plan march on Delhi in call for higher crop prices
NEXT Shehbaz Sharif re-elected as Pakistan's prime minister for a second term