Lebanon faces 'imminent' sanctions from US, warns Bahaa Hariri

Thank you for your reading and interest in the news Lebanon faces 'imminent' sanctions from US, warns Bahaa Hariri and now with details

Hind Al Soulia - Riyadh - The new government in Lebanon faces imminent sanctions from the US administration for its links to terror groups, Bahaa Hariri has disclosed predicting it will create an “earthquake” in Lebanese politics.

The eldest son of the former prime minister said the influence of Hezbollah on the country and its direct association with terrorism both in Lebanon and elsewhere meant that Washington will very soon impose tough restrictions on officials.

“Sanctions are going to cause an earthquake,” Mr Hariri told The National in an extensive interview. “We're waiting to see who are the people who will be sanctioned but this will send a very clear indication that the US is establishing a very hardline position against Hezbollah.” It is possible that the move could bring an end to the new government of Mustapha Adib that was formed in the protests following the Beirut port explosion in early August which killed 200 people and caused billions in damage.

However the visit by French president Emmanuel Macron last week in which he met a Hezbollah MP as he attempted to resolve Lebanon’s economic and political crisis was implicitly condemned by the businessman. “It's up to the French to decide if it's a mistake but for me, my position is very clear on Hezbollah, they have a military arm and are a terrorist organisation,” said the eldest son of the former Prime Minister Rafic Hariri who was assassinated by the terror group in 2005.

French President Emmanuel Macron was received warmly when he visited Beirut in the aftermath of the blast on August 4. AP
French President Emmanuel Macron was received warmly when he visited Beirut in the aftermath of the blast on August 4. AP

The Lebanese people were also very clear that they wanted a new politics that did not involve Hezbollah’s influence. “There is anger, frustration and disbelief that this is happening to them, that they are completely divorced from the political structure.”

Mr Hariri, 54, said an American official had privately told that even though Hezbollah might have been elected into power “so were the fascists”.

“For civil society cannot prevail if you have fascist people in power who don't care about lives,” he said. He stated that the terror group had only gained political power through violence. “When you have the bullets then you have pressure you can exert.”

He believed that Hezbollah’s main backers in Iran were also beginning to regard the group as a problem. “The Iranian leadership have a lot to think about as Hezbollah for them is becoming a liability it’s not an asset.”

Like other moderate Lebanese, Mr Hariri is increasingly frustrated with many European countries for failing to designate Hezbollah’s political wing as a terror group. Only Britain and Germany have done so which denies the group the ability to raise funds for its terrorist wing and political ambitions. With a few smaller European nations following suit Mr Hariri believes that major countries such as Spain and Italy will soon proscribe Hezbollah and the French will be forced to as well. “We have suffered a lot in Lebanon and others have to understand that warlords are not builders of nations.”

While Mr Hariri, whose brother Saad has twice been Lebanon’s prime minister, has kept out of politics he indicated to The National that he had an important political announcement to make “very soon” but added “I have no intention to be the Prime Minister, ever”.

A woman stands inside a damaged restaurant. AP Photo

People and employees attend a mass over the victims who were killed in the blast, at the Al-Roum hospital at Ashrafieh area in Beirut. EPA

Workers are pictured at the devastated site of the explosion at the port of Beirut. EPA

A man sleeps near a damaged car near the site of Tuesday's blast in Beirut's port area. REUTERS

Workers line at the devastated site of the explosion at the port of Beirut. EPA

French President Emmanuel Macron visits the devastated site of the explosion at the port of Beirut. EPA

People and employees attend a mass over the victims who were killed in the blast, at the Al-Roum hospital at Ashrafieh area in Beirut. EPA

A view of the port of Beirut on January 25, 2020, left, and on August 5, 2020, a day after the explosion. AFP

Bride Israa Seblani poses for a picture in the same place where she was taking her wedding photos at the moment of the explosion. Reuters

People stand with their belongings as they leave their damaged homes. Reuters

A Lebanese man shows injuries on his back after the massive explosion in Beirut. EPA

Men are seen sitting inside a damaged home, following Tuesday's blast in Beirut's port area. Reuters

A pedestrian takes photos of a badly damaged building in Beirut. Bloomberg

Lebanese Druze clerics check damaged cars. AP Photo

A statue representing the Lebanese expatriate is seen in front of a building that was damaged by the explosion. AP Photo

People walk with their belongings in the area of Mar Mikhael and Gemayzeh. EPA

The curtains in the rooms of the Le Gray hotel in the Lebanese capital Beirut swaying in the wind. AFP

A view of a damaged Fransa Bank. EPA

People check damaged vehicles. EPA

Volunteers clean the streets amid the wreckage. Reuters

People carry belongings after evacuating their damaged housing units at area of Mar Mikhael and Gemayzeh. EPA

A destroyed Bank Audi SAL branch stands in Beirut. Bloomberg

A worker wearing a protective face mask stands at the entrance to a destroyed Fransabank SAL branch in Beirut. Bloomberg

Volunteers carry brooms as they walk to clean the streets. Reuters

A woman sits in front of a damaged building. EPA

A general view of the Beirut port area after the massive explosion. EPA

An aerial view shows the massive damage done to the Electricity of Lebanon building. AFP

A view of the damaged building of the Lebanese fashion designer Zuhair Murad. EPA

Volunteers gather aid supplies to be distributed for those affected by Tuesday's blast. Reuters

Lebanese men clears rubble, one day after the explosion at the Beirut Port, in the Gemayzeh area. EPA

Lebanese youth salvage a velvet sofa from a destroyed apartment in the Gemayzeh area of Beirut. EPA

Lebanese activists take part in a campaign to clean the damaged neighbourhood of Mar Mikhael. AFP

An injured Lebanese shop owner sits at her desk selling her wares. EPA

546c286687.jpg

With an estimated fortune of more than $2 billion the property magnate has invested millions in his home country that he has not visited for ten years.

With so much anger amongst the people at Lebanon’s dire political and economic state, Mr Hariri believes it is at a crossroads where given the right impetus it could regain its previous prosperity with major constitutional reform.

I see Lebanon as a major tourist destination, a banking and financial centre

Bahaa Hariri

First it needed reconstruction aid from the IMF and World Bank to turn the corner and then substantial political reform. “You need to take Hezbollah and the warlords out of our structure and whoever supports them in the public sector, including the judiciary, army and security services. The government must then have special powers for a small period of time to bring in constitutional reform and resolve the sectarian issues by separating religion from the legislative executive branch.”

If Lebanon could resolve its decades-long political deadlock then it would face a bright future in which the four pillars of Lebanon’s economy – banking, tourism, education and catering - could flourish. “I see Lebanon as a major tourist destination, a banking and financial centre. It could also become an education centre because we have amazing universities and an eating capital with our great food and produce. What we need is to brand it successfully in the Arab world and the international community.”

Mr Hariri also welcomed the UAE’s treatment of its large Lebanese population which the Gulf State had “embraced” and said it would lead to further business opportunities. “We can form partnerships with the UAE in tourist projects, the banking sector and the food and education sector. All those four pillars that we have all have massive potential.”

Updated: September 8, 2020 08:35 PM

These were the details of the news Lebanon faces 'imminent' sanctions from US, warns Bahaa Hariri for this day. We hope that we have succeeded by giving you the full details and information. To follow all our news, you can subscribe to the alerts system or to one of our different systems to provide you with all that is new.

It is also worth noting that the original news has been published and is available at The National and the editorial team at AlKhaleej Today has confirmed it and it has been modified, and it may have been completely transferred or quoted from it and you can read and follow this news from its main source.

PREV Rescue official: 15 dead in Philippines as truck falls into ravine
NEXT FBI director warns that Chinese hackers are preparing to ‘wreak havoc’ on US critical infrastructure