Abu Dhabi fund helps save world's rarest duck from brink of extinction

Thank you for your reading and interest in the news Abu Dhabi fund helps save world's rarest duck from brink of extinction and now with details

Hind Al Soulia - Riyadh - The world’s rarest duck is in luck after fighting back from the brink of extinction thanks to a major Abu Dhabi cash boost.

Significant funding from the Species Conservation Fund is helping the Madagascar pochard move out of troubled waters and waddle towards a brighter future.

Efforts to repopulate the species were buoyed when 12 ducklings were seen at the remote Lake Sofia, in northern Madagascar.

The species was thought to be extinct until as recently as 2006, when a few ducks were discovered in another small lake.

Some were taken into captivity in 2009 for a breeding programme and a suitable site for their release was selected.

Elephants walk in a forested area near a railway track at Panbari village, on the outskirts of Gauhati, India. More then 30 wild elephants and their calves came out from nearby Amchang wildlife sanctuary and crossed a railway track in search of food in Panbari village Monday night. Wildlife activists say human encroachment in the forests of northeast India have forced elephants out of their natural habitats, triggering conflicts with locals. AP Photo

A herd of wild elephants look for food in a forested area near a railway track at Panbari village, on the outskirts of Gauhati, India. AP Photo

A baby langur looks at its mother from her lap on an oak tree in Dharmsala, India. AP Photo

Lion mother Kiara plays with one of her three white lion cubs in their enclosure at the zoo in Magdeburg, Germany. AP Photo

Lion mother Kiara stands besides her three white lion cubs, one male and two female, in their enclosure at the zoo in Magdeburg, Germany. AP Photo

A greater adjutant stork gulps a snake in a wetland in Pobitora wildlife sanctuary on the outskirts in Gauhati, India. AP Photo

A mhorr gazelle calf rests next to its mother in Budapest Zoo in Budapest, Hungary. EPA

Baby orangutans recently confiscated by Gunung Leuser National Park officers from illegal owners sit inside a cage as they wait to be transported to a rehabilitation center, in Medan, North Sumatra, Indonesia. AP Photo

A mother langur sits with her baby on an oak tree in Dharmsala, India.AP Photo

A cormorant bird spreads its wings next to migratory birds in a wetland in Pobitora wildlife sanctuary on the outskirts in Gauhati, India. AP Photo

A veterinarian tends to a koala rescued from an area affected by wildfires on board a Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (RSPCA) triage van in Bairnsdale, East Gippsland, Australia. Bloomberg

Mahouts and forest rangers bathe their elephants at Mila Pidie Conservation Response Unit (CRU) in Pidie District, Sumatra, Indonesia. The Elephant Patrol, a joint project between the Aceh Natural Resource Agency and the CRU, uses rangers riding trained elephants to push back wild ones posing a threat to human settlements in the forest. EPA

The UK-based Wildfowl and Wetlands Trust and the Jersey-based Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust managed the conservation project with the Aga Khan Foundation and Madagascar’s Ministry of the Environment.

Lake Sofia was chosen to reintroduce the species into the wild, and was designated as a protected site under the international Ramsar agreement on preserving wetlands.

Twenty-one young captive-bred pochards were released in December 2018.

The discovery of the ducklings this early came as a surprise to scientists, who were anticipating the development two or three years later.

“Reintroduced animals normally take a while to settle into their new site, and first breeding attempts are often unsuccessful, so this is a wholly unexpected but very welcome development,” said Peter Cranswick, WWT’s project manager.

“We celebrate each time we cross a threshold in this project, and the first breeding in the wild is very significant. But it only reminds us that the next huge task has begun, and it will take several years of learning from these birds before we can be confident that we understand their needs fully and how to restore the lake.”

News of the successful development in Africa was welcomed in the UAE.

“We are delighted to hear the news of this important step forward in securing the future of the Madagascar pochard,” said Razan Al Mubarak, managing director of Mohamed bin Zayed Species Conservation Fund.

“Our grant programme is focused on conservation projects devoted to the saving of individual species. With the Madagascar pochard being the rarest duck in the world, it was an obvious choice for us to support this project.”

A monitoring team based at the lake for the past year will continue to observe the ducklings as they seek to overcome many challenges, including the scarcity of food and cyclone season, which is currently in full swing.

Updated: February 9, 2020 01:09 PM

These were the details of the news Abu Dhabi fund helps save world's rarest duck from brink of extinction for this day. We hope that we have succeeded by giving you the full details and information. To follow all our news, you can subscribe to the alerts system or to one of our different systems to provide you with all that is new.

It is also worth noting that the original news has been published and is available at The National and the editorial team at AlKhaleej Today has confirmed it and it has been modified, and it may have been completely transferred or quoted from it and you can read and follow this news from its main source.

PREV As campaign heats up, Trump woos Latino, Black voters
NEXT Epic Games continues its legal battle to return Fortnite to the...