Work begins on rebuilding of Mosul's Great Mosque of Al Nuri

Thank you for your reading and interest in the news Work begins on rebuilding of Mosul's Great Mosque of Al Nuri and now with details

Hind Al Soulia - Riyadh - The mosque, which is where ISIS declared their caliphate in 2014, was destroyed by the miltants a few years later

An Iraqi worker clears rubble during the reconstruction of the Great Mosque of Al-Nuri in Mosul. AFP

Iraqi workers build scaffolding during the reconstruction of "Al-Hadba" leaning minaret in Mosul. AFP

An Iraqi worker clears rubble during the reconstruction of the Great Mosque of Al-Nuri in Mosul’s war-ravaged old town. AFP

An Iraqi worker carries wood logs during the reconstruction of the "Al-Hadba" leaning minaret in Mosul’s war-ravaged old town. AFP

Iraqi workers prepare scaffolds during the reconstruction of the Great Mosque of Al-Nuri in Mosul’s war-ravaged old town. AFP

Fragments of rubble collected to be re-used are seen during the reconstruction of Iraq's the Great Mosque of Al-Nuri and its adjoining "Al-Hadba" leaning minaret in Mosul. AFP.

Iraqi workers are seen under the dome of the Great Mosque of Al-Nuri during the complex's reconstruction in Mosul. AFP

Iraqi workers build wooden supporting structures during the reconstruction of "Al-Hadba" leaning minaret in Mosul rebuilding. AFP

An Iraqi worker enters the Great Mosque of Al-Nuri during the complex's reconstruction in Mosul. AFP

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The National

Dec 16, 2019

December 16, 2019

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Work has begun on the reconstruction of the Great Mosque of Al Nuri in the Iraqi city of Mosul, partially destroyed by ISIS in 2017.

The UAE announced in April last year that it would finance a $50 million (Dh183.7m) Unesco project to rebuild the mosque. Al Nuri was built in the 12th century and nicknamed “the hunchback” because of its leaning minaret.

In 2014, Abu Bakr Al Baghdadi declared ISIS’s ­caliphate from the mosque.

ISIS later destroyed the mosque during heavy ­fighting with Iraqi security forces.

Residents are still battling to rebuild their lives nearly two years later as Mosul was also where ISIS carried out some of its most heinous crimes, such as selling Yazidi women into slavery. They burnt printing presses and cafes and blew up archaeological and religious sites such as the Shrine of Nabi Yunus.

After the terrorists were ejected from the city in 2017, authorities and the locals who had stayed behind began salvaging what remained.

The Unesco programme is not restricted to Muslim sites – it includes two churches, a Yazidi temple and the central library of Mosul University.

Ernesto Ottone-Ramirez, assistant director-general for culture at Unesco, said in February that the regeneration process was an opportunity to inspire young people and connect them to their heritage.

“We are trying to get back what was once the spirit of Mosul,” he said. “Unesco has more than 70 years of experience in how to shape culture and policies, but this is a little bit different to projects we have done in the past in Cambodia and in Egypt.” An endowment to 10 people creating modern Islamic art, with a focus on visual and performing arts, will take place over the next five years.

Updated: December 16, 2019 08:32 PM

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